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Allison Grant, P.A., 730 S. Federal Highway, Lake Worth,  Florida 33460 | (561) 994-9646; Admitted to the Florida Bar
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WELCOME TO CHINESEDRYWALL.COM
The first website dedicated to educating the public about Chinese drywall
BEFORE YOU REMEDIATE YOUR HOME, PLEASE TALK TO YOUR ATTORNEY,
ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE KNAUF DRYWALL.  

On April 3, 2010, the Consumer Product Safety Commission ("CPSC") released Interim
Remediation Guidance for Homes with Problem Drywall   recommending that homeowners remove
and replace “all possible problem drywall”; all  fire safety alarm devices (including smoke alarms
and carbon monoxide alarms); all electrical components and wiring (insulated and uninsulated),
including outlets, switches and circuit breakers); and all gas service
piping and fire suppression sprinkler systems.  
Click here for full reports and studies.

Homeowners need to understand that this is not a remediation protocol - it is an interim
guidance.   There are many items that were not addressed by the CPSC which may need
to be replaced, such as air conditioners, but do not necessarily impact health and safety
and, thus, no recommendations were made by the CPSC.  On April 8, 2010, Judge Fallon,
who presides over the Multi District Litigation ("MDL"), issued Facts and Findings from the first
Chinese drywall trial,
Germano v. Taishan, finding as follows:

* Replacement of all drywall in the home;
* Replacement of all electrical wiring (insulated and uninsulated);
* Replacement of all copper pipes;
* Replacement of the entire HVAC system;
* Replacement of most appliances (particularly refrigerators);
* Replacement of electronics, such as TVs and computers;
* Replacement of all carpeting;
* Replacement of hardwood and vinyl flooring;
* Replacement of tile floor unless it can be protected during remediation;
* Replacement of cabinets and countertops (note, this ruling was based on economics
as the court found that it was more cost-effective in this case to replace these items rather than
attempt removal and storage);
* Replacement of trim, molding and baseboards;
* Replacement of all bathroom fixtures;
* After removal of all drywall, properties must be cleaned with HEPA vacuum, wet-wiped or power-
washed, and aired out for 15-30 days; and
* Property must be certified by an independent engineering company to certify that the
remediated home is safe.

Judge Fallon's ruling governs only the parties to the Germano lawsuit, however, it will likely be
persuasive in other cases and assist those homeowners who are remediating on their own.   

Note, Judge Fallon's ruling did not specifically address cross contamination of personal property
(such as mattresses and other porous materials).  According to the
Florida Department of Health,
based on reports from occupants and preliminary test results, corrosive gasses from the drywall
may be absorbed and re-emitted from porous materials such as drywall and fabrics. It is uncertain
whether this will affect materials such as
concrete and lumber. The effectiveness of cleaning these materials is currently unknown.

For those of you living in condominiums, there are special considerations, including the fact that
remediation is typically prohibited without your association's approval.   Check your condo docs.  
Further, remediation of one unit (especially if not properly done) may affect other units and the
community as a whole.   Units that do not contain Chinese drywall could exhibit some effects
caused by sulfur gasses from adjacent units.   .

BEFORE UNDERTAKING ANY REMEDIATION, PLEASE CONSULT AN ATTORNEY - YOU COULD
BE IMPACTING YOUR LEGAL RIGHTS AND DESTROYING EVIDENCE NECESSARY TO PURSUE
A CLAIM.  See
Preservation of Evidence Order.  
HOW DO I REMEDIATE MY HOME?
In March 2011, the Consumer Product Safety Commission announced new remediation
guidance which no longer requires the removal of wiring.  

Many have criticized these guidelines because they do not consider  practical concerns, such as
the inability to effectively wiring and the time/cost involved.   Further, snipping
wires may violate local building codes if there is insufficient slack and the use of junction boxes
will increase the cost.  The electrical insulating and coating materials may also retain the sulfur
odor, which in and of itself, warrants removal.   On average, rewiring costs
less than 5% of the
total
cost so the savings are minimal. Judge Fallon agreed, stating that the remediation protocol
announced following the
Germano and Hernandez trials is the correct protocol.  The evidence is
clear that the wire coating is not sufficient to keep the gasses out and there is corrosion under
the coating.   All wiring should be removed and replaced.   

Aside from immediate health and safety concerns, there are also practical reasons for removing
all wiring.   Judge Fallon remarked that it makes no sense to put a house together with the same
wiring that may go bad in the future and which could cause a home to burn down.  "Then you
have to strip the house again."  Knauf's counsel advised the Court that it will continue to remove
all wiring for homes in the Pilot Program.  Note, Sens. Bill Nelson
and Sen. Mark Warner have since requested that the CPSC allow the public to comment on the
new guidelines, which notably were released without any peer review.  
Click here for article.   
ENVIRON experts identify how corrosion can continue after Chinese drywall is
removed - June 2011

Continued corrosion after removal of corrosive drywall, co-authored by Principal Robert DeMott
and Senior Science Advisor Thomas Gauthier, and published in the June 2011 edition of the
Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention, reports on results obtained through ENVIRON’s
collaboration with metallurgists and materials scientists directly assessing the progressive nature
of corrosive reactions resulting from sulfur-containing compounds released from corrosive
gypsum wallboard.
 CLICK HERE FOR ABSTRACT